3 Warning Signs of Domestic Violence

Are you in an unsafe relationship? Or do you suspect that a loved one is being abused by their partner? Domestic violence doesn’t always look like the kind that you see in the media, so throw away your preconceived notions. Here are three real-world signs of DV.

Image result for 3 Warning Signs of Domestic Violence

  1. Frequent Injuries

This is the biggest indication of domestic violence, but don’t assume that it always involves black eyes or broken bones. Many abusers learn how to hurt their partners in ways that can be explained or excused. For example, they might leave bruises from tight grips that are brushed off as the victim’s clumsiness, or they might “accidentally” slam their victim’s fingers in a car door. The other person is forced to play it off like they did the deed themselves.

  1. No Control Over the Family Finances

This is one of the ways that a determined abuser can take control over their partner’s life. They make their partner utterly dependent on them by cutting off any access to their bank account or making them beg for money when they need to buy something. Not only is this degrading, but it also lessens the likelihood that the victim will have enough resources to leave their abuser. It’s abuse on multiple levels, and the perpetrators often get away with it because other people don’t even recognize it as harmful.

  1. Threats

DV isn’t always physical. Sometimes, it takes the form of threats. An abuser might promise to hurt their partner’s kids if their partner misbehaves, or they might guilt-trip them with threats to commit suicide or do something else equally drastic. Whether they’re threatening harm to themselves or other people, this is a clear marker of abuse. It’s attempting to control their partner through intimidation and manipulation.

These are just a few warning signs of domestic abuse. If you’d like a more in-depth take on the subject, consider signing up for a domestic violence online course. Not only will it teach you everything that you need to know, but it will also provide a good foundation for future social work.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *